Tagged: hurricane earl

The East Bahamas buoy (@buoy41046) survives Hurricane Earl’s fury, including significant wave heights of 48 feet and gusts nearing 100 mph, thanks to a low-load compliant mooring.

New Mooring Helps Buoy Survive Hurricane Earl

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East Bahamas buoy (@buoy41046) survives Hurricane Earl’s fury, including significant wave heights of 48 feet and gusts nearing 100 mph, thanks to a low-load compliant mooring." addthis:description="

New Mooring Helps Buoy Survive Hurricane Earl

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Hurricane Earl Flirts With The East Coast

Hurricane Earl is now a category 3 storm, with maximum sustained winds of 110 knots. The storm is forecast to continue North, but expected to remain just offshore of the Eastern seaboard. Immediate effects of the storm are being observed on the Southwestern Atlantic buoy (@buoy41043), with primary swell wave heights of 24.6 feet being reported as of 3 p.m. Eastern time.

The Cape Canaveral model (@buoy41010) shows a sharp increase in surf on Wednesday, with wave heights predicted to peak mid-day on Thursday (18.4 feet at 14.1 seconds 86°).

Looking further up the coast, surf on the Masonboro Inlet buoy (@buoy41110) is forecast to rise sharply from the Southeast on Thursday afternoon, peaking overnight (9.5 feet at 15.4 seconds 117°) then rapidly declining on Friday.

And a bit further North in New Jersey, wave heights on Buoy 44009 (26 NM Southeast of Cape May, NJ) are modeled to steadily increase Wednesday through Friday, providing some very contestable surf for the USBA Jenks Pro, which runs September 1st – 7th.

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Hurricane Danielle & Tropical Depression 7

The outlook for the East Coast this weekend includes long-period energy courtesy of Hurricane Danielle, which currently has maximum sustained winds of 85 mph. The hurricane is projected to swing North over the weekend and not expected to make landfall.

Effects of Hurricane Danielle are visible in the East Coast buoy models, with 13-14 second swells modeled to hit up and down the coast over the weekend. The offshore Cape Canaveral buoy (@buoy41010) shows an East swell building Saturday through Sunday (6.2 feet at 14.1 seconds 98°), with the swell period peaking late Sunday.

The effects of Danielle’s shift in direction and projected Northerly track are evident in the model which shows an increase in swell height (10.2 feet), but a subsequent loss of swell organization (11.1 seconds), with the swell direction shifting a total of 38° over three days, from Saturday (ESE, 101°) through Monday (ENE, 68°).

Looking a bit further into the Cape Canaveral model, there are already signs of another long-period ESE swell building next week Tuesday-Wednesday as a result of Tropical Depression 7.

Up the coast, similar conditions exist on both the Masonboro Inlet model:

As well as Montauk Point, whose location and distance from Danielle allows for a longer fetch than Florida, resulting in longer swell periods, much less directional shift (only 4°, from 135° to 131°), and a more organized swell overall:

Keep an eye on these models as the week progresses and Tropical Depression 7 potentially becomes Hurricane Earl, producing another Atlantic swell next week.

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